Original Documents

Article I, Section 01

All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

Article I, Section 02, Clause 1-2

The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature. No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the […]

Article I, Section 02, Clause 3

Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States which may be included within this Union, according to their respective Numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole Number of free Persons, including those bound to Service for a Term of Years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all […]

Article I, Section 02, Clause 4

When vacancies happen in the Representation from any State, the Executive Authority thereof shall issue Writs of Election to fill such Vacancies.  

Article I, Section 02, Clause 5 and Section 03, Clause 1

The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment. Section. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.

Article I, Section 03, Clause 2

Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and […]

Article I, Section 03, Clause 3

No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen.

Article I, Section 03, Clause 4-5

The Vice President of the United States shall be President of the Senate, but shall have no Vote, unless they be equally divided. The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United […]

Article I, Section 03, Clause 6-7

The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. When sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation. When the President of the United States is tried, the Chief Justice shall preside: And no Person shall be convicted without the Concurrence of two thirds of the Members present. Judgment in […]

Article I, Section 4, Clause 1-2

The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing Senators. The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and […]

Article I, Section 05, Clause 1

Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business; but a smaller Number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the Attendance of absent Members, in such Manner, and under such […]

Article I, Section 05, Clause 2

Each House may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behaviour, and, with the Concurrence of two thirds, expel a Member.

Article I, Section 05, Clause 3-4

Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the […]

Article I, Section 06, Clause 1

The Senators and Representatives shall receive a Compensation for their Services, to be ascertained by Law, and paid out of the Treasury of the United States. They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in […]

Article 1, Section 06, Clause 2

No Senator or Representative shall, during the Time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil Office under the Authority of the United States, which shall have been created, or the Emoluments whereof shall have been encreased during such time; and no Person holding any Office under the United States, shall be a […]

Article I, Section 07, Clause 1

All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.

Article I, Section 07, Clause 2

Every Bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and the Senate, shall, before it become a Law, be presented to the President of the United States: If he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his Objections to that House in which it shall have originated, who […]

Article I, Section 07, Clause 3

Every Order, Resolution, or Vote to which the Concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a question of Adjournment) shall be presented to the President of the United States; and before the Same shall take Effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed […]

Article I, Section 08, Clause 01

The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 02

To borrow Money on the credit of the United States;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 03

To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 04

To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 05-06

To coin Money, regulate the Value thereof, and of foreign Coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures; To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 07-08

To establish Post Offices and post Roads; To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 09

To constitute Tribunals inferior to the supreme Court;

Article I, Section 08, Clause 10-13

To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offences against the Law of Nations; To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water; To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer […]

Article I, Section 08, Clause 14-16

To make Rules for the Government and Regulation of the land and naval Forces; To provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions; To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the […]

Article I, Section 08, Clause 17

To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the […]

Article I, Section 08, Clause 18

To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.

Article I, Section 09, Clause 1

The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each Person.

Article I, Section 09, Clause 2-3

The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed.

Article I, Section 09, Clause 4-6

No Capitation, or other direct, Tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken. No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State. No Preference shall be given by any Regulation of Commerce or Revenue to the Ports of one State over those […]

Article I, Section 09, Clause 7

No Money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in Consequence of Appropriations made by Law; and a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time.

Article I, Section 09, Clause 8

No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State.

Article I, Section 10, Clause 1

No State shall enter into any Treaty, Alliance, or Confederation; grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal; coin Money; emit Bills of Credit; make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts; pass any Bill of Attainder, ex post facto Law, or Law impairing the Obligation of Contracts, or grant any […]

Article I, Section 10, Clause 2

No State shall, without the Consent of the Congress, lay any Imposts or Duties on Imports or Exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing it’s inspection Laws: and the net Produce of all Duties and Imposts, laid by any State on Imports or Exports, shall be for the Use of the Treasury of […]

Article I, Section 10, Clause 3

No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.

Article II, Section 1, Clause 1

The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:

Article II, Section 1, Clause 2

Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall […]

Article II, Section 1, Clause 3

The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and vote by Ballot for two Persons, of whom one at least shall not be an Inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And they shall make a List of all the Persons voted for, and of the Number of Votes for each; which List they shall […]

Article II, Section 1, Clause 4

The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.

Article II, Section 1, Clause 5

No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any Person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen […]

Article II, Section 1, Clause 6

In Case of the Removal of the President from Office, or of his Death, Resignation, or Inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the said Office, the Same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the Congress may by Law provide for the Case of Removal, Death, Resignation or Inability, both of the President […]

Article II, Section 1, Clause 7

The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them.

Article II, Section 1, Clause 8

Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation:–“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Article II, Section 2, Clause 1

The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any Subject relating […]

Article II, Section 2, Clause 2

He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all […]

Article II, Section 2, Clause 3

The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.

Article II, Section 3

He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses, or either of them, and in Case of Disagreement between them, with Respect to the Time […]

Article II, Section 4

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Article III, Section 1

The judicial Power of the United States shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated Times, receive for their Services […]

Article III, Section 2, Clause 1

The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;–to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;–to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction;–to Controversies to which the United States […]

Article III, Section 2, Clause 2

In all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, and those in which a State shall be Party, the supreme Court shall have original Jurisdiction. In all the other Cases before mentioned, the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the […]

Article III, Section 2, Clause 3

The Trial of all Crimes, except in Cases of Impeachment, shall be by Jury; and such Trial shall be held in the State where the said Crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed.

Article III, Section 3

Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court. The Congress shall have Power to […]

Article IV, Section 1

Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof.

Article IV, Section 2

The Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all Privileges and Immunities of Citizens in the several States. A Person charged in any State with Treason, Felony, or other Crime, who shall flee from Justice, and be found in another State, shall on Demand of the executive Authority of the State from which he […]

Article IV, Section 3

New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as […]

Article IV, Section 4

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government, and shall protect each of them against Invasion; and on Application of the Legislature, or of the Executive (when the Legislature cannot be convened), against domestic Violence.

Article V

The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this […]

Article VI

All Debts contracted and Engagements entered into, before the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this Constitution, as under the Confederation. This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the […]

Article VII

The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same. The Word, “the,” being interlined between the seventh and eighth Lines of the first Page, the Word “Thirty” being partly written on an Erazure in the fifteenth Line of the first […]

Amendment I

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Amendment II

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment III

No Soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the Owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.  

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject […]

Amendment VI

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be […]

Amendment VII

In Suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.

Amendment VIII

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

Amendment IX

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Amendment XI

The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State. Passed by Congress March 4, 1794. Ratified February 7, 1795. Note: Article […]

Amendment XII

The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and […]

Amendment XIII

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Passed by Congress January 31, 1865. Ratified December […]

Amendment XIV

Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State […]

Amendment XV

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude– Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Passed by Congress February […]

Amendment XVI

The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States, and without regard to any census or enumeration. Passed by Congress July 2, 1909. Ratified February 3, 1913. Note: Article I, section 9, of the Constitution was modified by amendment 16.  

Amendment XVII

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each State shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the State legislatures. When vacancies happen in […]

Amendment XVIII

Section 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited. Section 2. The Congress and the several States shall […]

Amendment XIX

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Passed by Congress June 4, 1919. Ratified August 18, 1920.

Amendment XX

Section 1. The terms of the President and the Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 3rd day of January, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this article had not been ratified; and the […]

Amendment XXI

Section 1. The eighteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed. Section 2. The transportation or importation into any State, Territory, or Possession of the United States for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited. Section 3. This article shall […]

Amendment XXII

Section 1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of President more […]

Amendment XXIII

Section 1. The District constituting the seat of Government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as Congress may direct: A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a State, but […]

Amendment XXIV

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to […]

Amendment XXV

Section 1. In case of the removal of the President from office or of his death or resignation, the Vice President shall become President. Section 2. Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote […]

Amendment XXVI

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age. Section 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Passed by Congress […]

Amendment XXVII

No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of representatives shall have intervened. Originally proposed Sept. 25, 1789. Ratified May 7, 1992.  

The Preamble of the United States Constitution

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

Article I

Article. I. Section. 1. All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. Section. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in […]

Article I, Section 03

Section. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote. Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The […]

Article I, Section 08

Section. 8. The Congress shall have Power To lay and collect Taxes, Duties, Imposts and Excises, to pay the Debts and provide for the common Defence and general Welfare of the United States; but all Duties, Imposts and Excises shall be uniform throughout the United States; To borrow Money on the credit of the United […]

Article I, Section 09

Section. 9. The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a Tax or duty may be imposed on such Importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each […]

Article II

Article. II. Section. 1. The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature […]

Article II, Section 2

Section. 2. The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any […]

Article III

Article III. Section. 1. The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the supreme and inferior Courts, shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour, and shall, at stated Times, […]

Article IV

Article. IV. Section. 1. Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State. And the Congress may by general Laws prescribe the Manner in which such Acts, Records and Proceedings shall be proved, and the Effect thereof. Section. 2. The Citizens of […]

Essays on Founding Documents/Readings

August 23, 2010 – Federalist No. 84 – Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered, From McLean’s Edition, New York (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Dr. Matthew Spalding, Director of the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at The Heritage Foundation

August 20, 2010 – Federalist No. 83 – The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury, From McLEAN’S Edition, New York (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Kelly Shackelford, President/CEO of the Liberty Institute

August 19, 2010 – Federalist No. 82 –The Judiciary Continued, From McLEAN’s Edition, New York (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Robert Lowry Clinton, Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Southern Illinois University Carbondale

August 18, 2010 – Federalist No. 81 – The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority, From McLean’s Edition, New York – Guest Blogger: Jeffrey Reed is a professional orchestra conductor, holds a degree from the Louis B. Brandeis School of Law, and has taught constitutional law at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky

August 16, 2010 – Federalist Paper No. 78 & 79 – Janine Turner

August 16, 2010 – Federalist No. 78 & Federalist No. 79 – Janine Turner

August 12, 2010 – Federalist No. 77- Cathy Gillespie

August 10, 2010 – Federalist No. 75 – The Treaty Making Power of the Executive, For the Independent Journal (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Nathaniel Stewart, attorney and fellow at the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs

August 6, 2010 – Federalist No. 73 – The Provision for the Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute in Fairfax, Virginia

August 6, 2010 – Federalist No. 73 – Cathy Gillespie

August 5, 2010 – Federalist No. 72 – The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Kelly Shackelford, President/CEO of the Liberty Institute

August 4, 2010 – Federalist No. 71 – The Duration in Office of the Executive, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Kyle Scott, PhD, Professor in the Political Science Department and Honors College at the University of Houston

August 5, 2010 – Federalist No. 71 and Federalist No. 72 – Cathy Gillespie

August 2, 2010 – Federalist No. 69 – The Powers of the President, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

July 30, 2010 – Federalist No. 68 – The Mode of Electing the President, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

July 29, 2010 – Federalist No. 67 – The Executive Department, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Troy Kickler, Founding Director of the North Carolina History Project.

July 29, 2010 – Federalist No. 67 – Cathy Gillespie

July 28, 2010 – Federalist No. 66 – Janine Turner

July 27, 2010 – Federalist No. 65 – The Powers of the Senate Continued, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Troy Kickler, Ph.D., Founding Director of the North Carolina History Project

July 27, 2010 – Federalist No. 65 – Cathy Gillespie

July 26, 2010 – Federalist No. 64 – Cathy Gillespie

July 23, 2010 – Federalist No. 63 – Janine Turner

July 22, 2010 – Federalist No. 62 – Cathy Gillespie

July 21, 2010 – Federalist No. 61 – The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Kyle Scott, Political Science Department and Honors College Professor at the University of Houston

July 20, 2010 – Federalist No. 60 – Janine Turner

July 19, 2010 – Federalist No. 59 – Cathy Gillespie

July 19, 2010 – Federalist No. 59 – Janine Turner

July 16, 2010 – Federalist No. 58 – Objection that the Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered (Madison) – Guest Blogger: Brion McClanahan, Ph.D., author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Founding Fathers

July 13, 2010 – Federalist No. 55 – Janine Turner

July 12, 2010 – Federalist No. 54 – Cathy Gillespie

July 8, 2010 – Federalist No. 52 – The House of Representatives, From the New York Packet (Madison or Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute in Fairfax, Virginia

July 7, 2010 – Federalist No. 51 – The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments, From the New York Packet (Hamilton or Madison) – Guest Blogger: Professor John S. Baker, Dale E. Bennett Professor of Law at Louisiana State University

June 7, 2010 – Federalist No. 51 – Cathy Gillespie

July 6, 2010 – Federalist No. 50 – The Same Subject Continued: The Total Number of the House of Representatives (Madison or Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Brion McClanahan, Ph.D., author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Founding Fathers

July 5, 2010 – Federalist No. 49 – Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention, From the New York Packet (Madison) – Guest Blogger: Colleen Sheehan, Professor of Political Science at Villanova University and Director of the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the Study of Free Institutions and the Public Good

July 6, 2010 – Federalist No. 49 & Federalist No. 50 – Cathy Gillespie

July 2, 2010 – Federalist No. 48 – These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other, From the New York Packet (Madison) – Guest Blogger: John S. Baker, Jr. the Dale E. Bennett Professor of Law at Louisiana State University

July 2, 2010 – Federalist No. 48 – Cathy Gillespie

July 1, 2010 – Federalist No. 47 – Cathy Gillespie

June 30, 2010 – Federalist No. 46 – The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared, From the New York Packet (Madison) – Guest Blogger: David B. Kopel, Research Director at the Independence Institute, and Adjunct Professor of Advanced Constitutional Law at Denver University, Sturm College of Law

June 29, 2010 – Federalist No. 45 – Cathy Gillespie

June 28, 2010 – Federalist No. 44 – Cathy Gillespie

June 21, 2010 – Federalist No. 39 – The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles, For the Independent Journal (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: John S. Baker, Jr., the Dale E. Bennett Professor of Law at Louisiana State University

June 11, 2010 – Federalist No. 33 – Cathy Gillespie

June 10, 2010 – Federalist No. 32 – The Same Subject Continued: Concerning the General Power of Taxation, From the New York Packet (Hamilton) – Guest Blogger: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

June 10, 2010 – Federalist No. 32 – Cathy Gillespie

June 9, 2010 – Federalist No. 31 – Janine Turner

June 9, 2010 – Federalist No. 31 – Cathy Gillespie

June 3, 2010 – Federalist No. 27 – Cathy Gillespie

May 31, 2010 – Federalist No. 24 – Cathy Gillespie

May 28, 2010 – Federalist No. 23 – Cathy Gillespie

May 21, 2010 – Federalist No. 18 – The Same Subject Continued: The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union, For the Independent Journal (Hamilton & Madison) – Guest Blogger: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

May 20, 2010 – Federalist No. 17 – Janine Turner

May 13, 2010 – Federalist No. 12 – Cathy Gillespie

May 12, 2010 – Federalist No. 11 – Cathy Gillespie

May 4, 2010 – Federalist No. 5 – Janine Turner

April 26, 2010 – Articles IV-VII – Janine Turner

April 26, 2010 – Articles IV – VII – Cathy Gillespie

April 26, 2010 – Articles IV – VII of the U.S. Constitution – Guest Blogger: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 23, 2010 – Article III of the U.S. Constitution – Guest Blogger: Lawrence J. Spiwak, President of the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies

April 23, 2010 – Article III of the U.S. Constitution – Cathy Gillespie

April 23, 2010 – Article III U.S. Constitution – Janine Turner

April 22, 2010 – Article II of the U.S. Constitution – Guest Blogger: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

April 22, 2010 – Article II of the U.S. Constitution – Cathy Gillespie

April 22, 2010 – Article II of the U.S. Constitution – Janine Turner

April 21, 2010 Article I of the U.S. Constitution – Cathy Gillespie

April 21, 2010 Article I of the U.S. Constitution – Janine Turner

April 21, 2010 – Article I of the U.S. Constitution – Guest Blogger: David Bobb, Director and Lecturer in Political Science | Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship | Hillsdale College

April 27, 2010 – The Amendments to the United States Constitution – Cathy Gillespie

April 27, 2010 – The Amendments to the United States Constitution – Janine Turner

April 27, 2010 – The Amendments to the United States Constitution – Michael Krauss, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law

February 21, 2011 – Analyzing the Constitution for 90 Days – The Preamble to the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: David Bobb, Ph.D., director of the Hillsdale College Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship, in Washington, D.C.

February 22, 2011 – Article I, Section 01 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute in Fairfax, Virginia

February 23, 2011 – Article I, Section 02, Clause 1-2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Senior Fellow with the Heartland Institute

February 24, 2011 – Article I, Section 02, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: W. B. Allen, Havre de Grace, MD

February 25, 2011 – Article I, Section 02, Clause 4 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

February 28, 2011 – Article I, Section 02, Clause 5 and Section 3, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Professor William Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

March 1, 2011 – Article I, Section 03, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joe Postell, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

March 2, 2011 – Article I, Section 03, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

March 3, 2011 – Article I, Section 03, Clause 4-5 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: David Addington, Vice President for Domestic and Economic Policy of The Heritage Foundation and a former chief of staff and counsel to the Vice President of the United States

March 4, 2011 – Article I, Section 03, Clause 6-7 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: The Honorable James E. Rogan, Judge of the Superior Court of California

March 7, 2011 – Article I, Section 04, Clause 1-2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 8, 2011 – Article I, Section 05, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

March 9, 2011 – Article I, Section 05, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Paul S. Teller, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Republican Study Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives

March 10, 2011 – Article I, Section 05, Clause 3-4 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Scot Faulkner, Executive Director, The Dreyfuss Initiative on Civics

March 11, 2011 – Article I, Section 06, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

March 14, 2011 – Article I, Section 06, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Steven H. Aden, Senior Counsel, Alliance Defense Fund

March 15, 2011 – Article I, Section 07, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 16, 2011 – Article I, Section 07, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: George Schrader, Student of Political Science at Hillsdale College

March 17, 2011 – Article I, Section 07, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kyle Scott, Political Science Department and Honors College Professor at the University of Houston

March 18, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 01 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: John S. Baker, Jr., the Dale E. Bennett Professor of Law at Louisiana State University

March 21, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 02 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 22, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 03 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Dr. John S. Baker, Jr., Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University Law School

March 23, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 04 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, legal commentator and a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute

March 24, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 05-06 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Troy Kickler, Founding Director of North Carolina History Project and Editor of northcarolinahistory.org

March 25, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 07-08 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Allison Hayward, Vice President of Policy at the Center for Competitive Politics

March 28, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 09 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute

March 29, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 10-13 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, legal commentator and a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute

March 30, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 14-16 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: George Schrader, Student of Political Science at Hillsdale College

March 31, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 17 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

April 1, 2011 – Article I, Section 08, Clause 18 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 4, 2011 – Article I, Section 9, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: W. B. Allen, Havre de Grace, MD

April 5, 2011 – Article I, Section 09, Clause 2-3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 6, 2011 – Article I, Section 09, Clause 4-6 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Allison Hayward, Vice President of Policy at the Center for Competitive Politics

April 7, 2011 – Article I, Section 09, Clause 7 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Dan Morenoff, Attorney

April 8, 2011 – Article I, Section 09, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kyle Scott, Political Science Department and Honors College Professor at the University of Houston

April 11, 2011 – Article I, Section 10, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 12, 2011 – Article I, Section 10, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Justin Butterfield, Constitutional Attorney, Liberty Institute

April 13, 2011 – Article I, Section 10, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager at the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies, The Heritage Foundation

April 14, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Lawrence J. Spiwak, President of the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies

April 15, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Tara Ross, Author, Enlightened Democracy: The Case for the Electoral College

April 18, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 19, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 4 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Gary S. McCaleb, Senior Counsel, Alliance Defense Fund

April 20, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: James D. Best, author of Tempest at Dawn

April 21, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 6 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joe Postell, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

April 22, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 7 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

April 25, 2011 – Article II, Section 1, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 26, 2011 – Article II, Section 2, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Baskin, ConSource Researcher

April 27, 2011 – Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Professor William Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

April 28, 2011 – Article II, Section 2, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 29, 2011 – Article II, Section 3, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute

May 2, 2011 – Article II, Section 4 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager of the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies, The Heritage Foundation

May 3, 2011 – Article III, Section 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kyle Scott, Political Science Department and Honors College Professor at the University of Houston

May 4, 2011 – Article III, Section 2, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

May 5, 2011 – Article III, Section 2, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame

May 6, 2011 – Article III, Section 2, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kyle Scott, Political Science Department and Honors College Professor at the University of Houston

May 9, 2011 – Article III, Section 3, Clause 1-2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, legal commentator and a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute

May 10, 2011 – Article IV, Section 1 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Cynthia Dunbar, attorney, author, speaker and Assistant Professor of Law at Liberty University

May 11, 2011 – Article IV, Section 2 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

May 12, 2011 – Article IV, Section 3 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Dan Morenoff, Attorney

May 13, 2011 – Article IV, Section 4 of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Professor William Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

May 16, 2011 – Article V of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

May 17, 2011 – Article VI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Nathaniel Stewart, Attorney

May 18, 2011 – Article VII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Dan Morenoff, Attorney

May 19, 2011 – Amendment I of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayists: Mr. Kelly Shackelford, President and CEO for Liberty Institute, and Justin Butterfield, Constitutional Attorney, Liberty Institute

May 20, 2011 – Amendment II of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: David B. Kopel, Research Director at the Independence Institute, and Adjunct Professor of Advanced Constitutional Law at Denver University, Sturm College of Law

May 23, 2011 – Amendment III of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Robert Chapman-Smith, Instructional Design Associate at the Bill of Rights Institute

May 24, 2011 – Amendment IV of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Jeffrey Reed, a professional orchestra conductor, holds a degree from the Louis B. Brandeis School of Law, and has taught constitutional law at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky

May 25, 2011 – Amendment V of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

May 26, 2011 – Amendment VI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Marc. S. Lampkin, a Vice President at Quinn Gillespie

May 27, 2011 – Amendment VII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: W. David Stedman and LaVaughn G. Lewis, Co-Editors, Our Ageless Constitution

May 30, 2011 – Amendment VIII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

May 31, 2011 – Amendment IX of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Steven H. Aden, Senior Counsel, Alliance Defense Fund

June 1, 2011 – Amendment X of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

June 2, 2011 – Amendment XI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kevin Theriot, Senior Counsel with the Alliance Defense Fund

June 3, 2011 – Amendment XII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

June 6, 2011 – Amendment XIII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Hadley Heath, a Senior Policy Analyst at the Independent Women’s Forum

June 7, 2011 – Amendment XIV of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Kevin Theriot, Senior Counsel with the Alliance Defense Fund

June 8, 2011 – Amendment XV of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Colin Hanna, President, Let Freedom Ring

June 9, 2011 – Amendment XVI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, legal commentator and a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute

June 10, 2011 – Amendment XVII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Dr. John S. Baker, Jr., Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Catholic University School of Law; Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University Law Center

June 13, 2011 – Amendment XVIII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

June 14, 2011 – Amendment XIX of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Carol Crossed, Owner and President, Susan B Anthony Birthplace Museum

June 15, 2011 – Amendment XX of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

June 16, 2011 – Amendment XXI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

June 17, 2011 – Amendment XXII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Marc. S. Lampkin, a Vice President at Quinn Gillespie

June 20, 2011 – Amendment XXIII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, legal commentator and a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute

June 21, 2011 – Amendment XXIV of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

June 22, 2011 – Amendment XXV of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

June 23, 2011 – Amendment XXVI of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

June 24, 2011 – Amendment XXVII of the United States Constitution – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Ph.D., Duncan Black Professor of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute

February 20, 2012 – Essay #1 – The Amendment Process – Guest Essayist: Dr. Larry P. Arnn, president of Hillsdale College, and author of The Founders’ Key: The Divine and Natural Connection Between the Declaration and the Constitution and What We Risk by Losing It

February 21, 2012 – Essay #2 – The Bill of Rights, Purpose and Benefits – Guest Essayist: Richard Brookhiser, Author, James Madison

February 23, 2012 – Essay #4 – Amendment I: The Establishment Clause – Guest Essayist:David J. Bobb, Ph.D., director of the Hillsdale College Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship, in Washington, D.C.

February 24, 2012 – Essay #5 – Amendment I: The Free Exercise Clause – Guest Essayist: Eric Rassbach, Deputy General Counsel at The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Watch or Listen to Janine Turner Read: Amendment I: The Establishment Clause – Guest Essayist: David J. Bobb, Ph.D., director of the Hillsdale College Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship, in Washington, D.C.

Watch or Listen to Janine Turner Read: Amendment I: The Free Exercise Clause – Guest Essayist: Eric Rassbach, Deputy General Counsel at The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

February 27, 2012 – Essay #6 – Amendment I: Congress Shall make no law….abridging the freedom of speech – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty

March 1, 2012 – Essay #9 – Amendment I: Right to petition the Government for a redress of grievances – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

February 29, 2012 – Essay #8 – Amendment I: Congress Shall Make No Laws….Abridging the Right of the People to Peacefully Assemble – Guest Essayist: Professor William Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

February 28, 2012 – Essay #7 – Amendment I: Freedom of the Press – Guest Essayist: James C. Duff, CEO of the Newseum and the Diversity Institute, and President and CEO of the Freedom Forum

Listen to Janine Turner Interview Andrew Langer, President of the Institute for Liberty on the Janine Turner Radio Show – on Amendment I: Congress Shall make no law….abridging the freedom of speech

Friday, March 2, 2012 – Essay #10 – Amendment I: Guest Essayist: Justin Dyer, Ph.D., Author and Professor of Political Science, University of Missouri

March 5, 2012 – Essay #11 – Amendment II: Well Regulated Militia Being Necessary to the Security of a Free State – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 6, 2012 – Essay #12 – Amendment II: The Right of the People to Keep & Bear Arms, Shall Not Be Infringed – Guest Essayist: Dr. John Lott, author of More Guns, Less Crime (University of Chicago Press, third edition, 2010).

March 14, 2012 – Essay #18 – Amendment V: The Right to a Grand Jury – Guest Essayist: Allison R. Hayward, Vice President of Policy at the Center for Competitive Politics

March 9, 2012 – Essay #15 – Amendment IV: Protection Against Unreasonable Searches – Guest Essayist: Dr. Charles K. Rowley, General Director of The Locke Institute and Duncan Black Professor Emeritus of Economics at George Mason University

March 8, 2012 – Essay #14 – Amendment III: Situation in Time of War – Guest Essayist: Andrew Dykstal, a Junior at Hillsdale College

March 7, 2012 – Essay #13 – Amendment III: Freedom From Quartering Soldiers in Peacetime – Guest Essayist: William Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

March 12, 2012 – Essay #16 – Amendment IV: Warrants to Have Probable Cause – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Senior Fellow with the Heartland Institute

March 13, 2012 – Essay #17 – Amendment IV: Warrants Must Describe the Place and Persons With Particularity – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

March 15, 2012 – Essay #19 – Amendment V: Right Against Double Jeopardy – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 16, 2012 – Essay #20 – Amendment V: Right Against Self- Incrimination – Guest Essayist: Professor Kyle Scott, Professor of American Politics and Constitutional Law, Duke University

March 19, 2012 – Essay #21 – Amendment V: Right to Due Process to Prevent Deprivation of Life, Liberty, or Property – Guest Essayist: J. Eric Wise, partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP law firm

March 20, 2012 – Essay #22 – Amendment V: Right to Just Compensation in Eminent Domain Matters – Guest Essayist: Gordon S. Jones, Utah Valley University

March 21, 2012 – Essay #23 – Amendment V – Guest Essayist: Michelle Griffes, Manager of Programs and Curriculum Development at the Bill of Rights Institute

March 22, 2012 – Essay #24 – Amendment VI: Right to a Speedy Trial – Guest Essayist: Cynthia Dunbar, attorney, author, speaker and Assistant Professor of Law at Liberty University

March 23, 2012 – Essay #25 – Amendment VI: Right to a Public Trial – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

March 26, 2012 – Essay #26 – Amendment VI: Right to an Impartial Jury – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager in the B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics at the Heritage Foundation

March 27, 2012 – Essay #27 – Amendment VI: Right to be Informed of the Charge – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

March 28, 2012 – Essay #28 – Amendment VI: Right to Confront Accuser – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Senior Fellow with the Heartland Institute

March 29, 2012 – Essay #29 – Amendment VI: Right to Have Assistance of Counsel – Guest Essayist: Professor Kyle Scott, Professor of American Politics and Constitutional Law, Duke University

March 30, 2012 – Essay #30 – Amendment VI – Guest Essayist: Nathaniel Stewart, Attorney

April 2, 2012 – Essay #31 – Amendment VII: Right to Trial in Civil Disputes – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager in the B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics at the Heritage Foundation

April 3, 2012 – Essay # 32 – Amendment VII: Trier of Fact Versus Law – Guest Essayist: J. Eric Wise, a partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP law firm

April 4, 2012 – Essay # 33 – Amendment VIII: Right to Reasonable Bail – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

April 5, 2012 – Essay #34 – Amendment VIII: Right Against Excessive Fines – Guest Essayist: Allison R. Hayward, Vice President of Policy at the Center for Competitive Politics

April 6, 2012 – Essay # 35 – Amendment VIII: Right Against Cruel and Unusual Punishment – Guest Essayist: Nathaniel Stewart, Attorney

April 9, 2012 – Essay #36 – Amendment VIII: Guest Essayist: Matthew Mehan, Publius Fellow and U.S. History Teacher

April 10, 2012 – Essay #37 – Amendment IX: Rights Which Are Enumerated – Guest Essayist: W.B. Allen, Dean Emeritus, James Madison College; Emeritus Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

April 11, 2012 – Essay #38 – Amendment IX: Guest Essayist: Brion McClanahan Ph.D., author of The Founding Fathers Guide to the Constitution

April 12, 2012 – Essay #39 – Amendment X: Our Constitution a Grant of Limited Powers to the National Government – Guest Essayist: Dr. John S. Baker, Jr., Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Catholic University School of Law; Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University Law Center

April 13, 2012 – Essay #40 – Amendment X: Rights Reserved to the States and the People – Guest Essayist: George Landrith, an attorney and President of Frontiers of Freedom

April 16, 2012 – Essay #41 – Amendment X: Modern Issues of States’ Rights – Guest Essayist: Brion McClanahan Ph.D., author of The Founding Fathers Guide to the Constitution

April 17, 2012 – Essay #42 – Amendment XI: Right of States to Sovereign Immunity – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 18, 2012 – Essay #43 – Amendment XII: Reforming the Electoral College – Guest Essayist: Tara Ross, Author, Enlightened Democracy: The Case for the Electoral College

April 19, 2012 – Essay #44 – Amendment XII: A Tie in the Electoral College – Guest Essayist: Tara Ross, Author, Enlightened Democracy: The Case for the Electoral College

April 20, 2012 – Essay #45 – Amendment XII: Circumstances Allowing the Senate to Choose the Vice-President – Guest Scholar: Hans Eicholz, Historian and Senior Fellow with Liberty Fund, Inc., an educational foundation based in Indianapolis, Indiana

Monday, April 23, 2012 – Essay #46 – Amendment XIII: Section 1 – Guest Essayist: W.B. Allen, Dean Emeritus, James Madison College; Emeritus Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University

April 24, 2012 – Essay #47 – Amendment XIII: Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Senior Fellow with the Heartland Institute

April 25, 2012 – Essay #48 – Amendment XIV, Section 1 – Citizenship Defined – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

April 26, 2012 – Essay #49 – Amendment XIV Privileges or Immunities – Guest Essayist: Kevin R. C. Gutzman, M.P.Aff., J.D., Ph.D., Associate professor of the Department of History and Non-Western Cultures at Western Connecticut State University

April 27, 2012 – Essay #50 – Amendment XIV Due Process Protection – Guest Essayist: Professor Will Morrisey, William and Patricia LoMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

Monday, April 30, 2012 – Essay #51 – Amendment XIV, Section 1: Equal Protection Under the Law – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 – Essay # 52 – Amendment XIV, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: Timothy Sandefur, Author and a principal attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation

Wednesday, May 2, 2012 – Essay # 53 – Amendment XIV, Section 3 – Guest Essayist: Timothy Sandefur, Author and a principal attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation

Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Essay # 54 – Amendment XIV, Section 4 – Guest Essayist: Timothy Sandefur, Author and a principal attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation

Friday, May 4, 2012 – Essay # 55 – Amendment XIV, Section 5 – Guest Essayist: Timothy Sandefur, Author and a principal attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation

May 7, 2012 – Essay #56 – Amendment XIV – The 14th Amendment’s Impact on the Constitution – Guest Essayist: Justin Dyer, Ph.D., Author and Professor of Political Science, University of Missouri

May 7, 2012 – Essay #56 – Amendment XIV – The 14th Amendment’s Impact on the Constitution – Guest Essayist: Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence, Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University

May 8, 2012 – Essay #57 – Amendment XV – Guest Essayist: Colin Hanna, President, Let Freedom Ring

May 9, 2012 – Essay #58 – Amendment XV, Section Two – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

May 10, 2012 – Essay #59 – Amendment XVI – Guest Essayist: Marc Lampkin, Shareholder at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck and graduate of the Boston College Law School

May 11, 2012 – Essay #60 – Amendment XVI – Guest Essayist: James D. Best, author of Tempest at Dawn, a novel about the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and Principled Action, Lessons from the Origins of the American Republic

May 14, 2012 – Essay #61 – Amendment XVII: Direct Election of Senators – Guest Essayist: Dr. John S. Baker, Jr., Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Catholic University School of Law; Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University Law Center

May 15, 2012 – Essay #62 – Amendment XVII: Reform or Revision? – Guest Essayist: Ralph A. Rossum, Ph.D., the Salvatori Professor of American Constitutionalism at Claremont McKenna College

May 16, 2012 – Essay #63 – Amendment XVIII, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Gordon Lloyd, Ph.D., Professor of Public Policy at Pepperdine University

May 17, 2012 – Essay #64 – Amendment XVIII, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

May 18, 2012 – Essay #65 – Amendment XIX – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager in the B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics at the Heritage Foundation

May 6, 2012 – Essay #56 – Amendment XIV – The 14th Amendment’s Impact on the Constitution – Guest Essayist: J. Eric Wise, a partner in the law firm of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP

March 15, 2012 – Essay #19 – Amendment V: Right Against Double Jeopardy – Guest Essayist: Guest Essayist: Charles E. Rice, Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Notre Dame

May 21, 2012 – Essay #66 – Amendment XX, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Frank M. Reilly, Esq., a partner at Potts & Reilly, L.L.P.

May 22, 2012 – Essay #67 – Amendment XX, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: Marc Lampkin, Shareholder at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck and graduate of the Boston College Law School

May 23, 2012 – Essay #68 – Amendment XX, Section 3 – Guest Essayist: David J. Bobb, Director, Hillsdale College Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship in Washington, D.C., and lecturer in politics

May 24, 2012 – Essay #69 – Amendment XX, Section 4 – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

May 25, 2012 – Essay #70 – Amendment XXI, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Lawrence J. Spiwak, President of the Phoenix Center for Advanced Legal and Economic Public Policy Studies

May 28, 2012 – Essay #71 – Amendment XXI, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: Frank M. Reilly, Esq., a partner at Potts & Reilly, L.L.P.

May 29, 2012 – Essay #72 – Amendment XXII – Guest Essayist: Michaela Goertzen, Speechwriter, Office of Alaska Lt. Governor Mead Treadwell

May 30, 2012 – Essay #73 – Amendment XXII – Guest Essayist: James D. Best, author of Tempest at Dawn, a novel about the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and Principled Action, Lessons from the Origins of the American Republic

May 31, 2012 – Essay #74 –Amendment XXIII – Guest Essayist: Julia Shaw, Research Associate and Program Manager in the B. Kenneth Simon Center for Principles and Politics at the Heritage Foundation

June 1, 2012 – Essay #75 – Amendment XXIV, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

June 4, 2012 – Essay #76 – Amendment XXIV, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

June 5, 2012 – Essay #77 –Amendment XXV, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Hadley Heath, Senior Policy Analyst at the Independent Women’s Forum

June 6, 2012 – Essay #78 –Amendment XXV, Section 2 – Guest Essayist: Hadley Heath, Senior Policy Analyst at the Independent Women’s Forum

June 7, 2012 – Essay #79: Amendment XXV: Presidential Succession Section 3 – Horace Cooper, legal commentator and the Director of the Center for Law and Regulation at the Institute for Liberty

June 8, 2012 – Essay #80 – Amendment XXV, Section 4 – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Director of the Institute for Liberty’s Center for Law and Regulation, and a legal commentator

June 11, 2012 – Essay #81 – Amendment XXVI, Section 1 – Guest Essayist: Janice Brenman, Attorney

June 12, 2012 – Essay #82 – Amendment XXVI, Section Two – Guest Essayist: Horace Cooper, Director of the Institute for Liberty’s Center for Law and Regulation, and a legal commentator

June 13, 2012 – Essay #83 –Amendment XXVII – Guest Essayist: James D. Best, author of Tempest at Dawn, a novel about the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and Principled Action, Lessons from the Origins of the American Republic

June 14, 2012 – Essay #84 – Proposed Congressional Apportionment Amendment, Essayist: David Eastman, 2011 Claremont Institute Abraham Lincoln Fellow

June 20, 2012 – Essay #88 – A Look At Another Proposed Amendment: Women’s Equal Rights – Guest Essayist: Allison R. Hayward, political and ethics attorney

June 21, 2012 – Essay #89 – Proposed Amendment: D.C. Statehood – Guest Essayist: Nathaniel Stewart, Attorney

June 22, 2012 – Essay #90 – America’s experiment in self-government reveals itself in the Amendment process – Guest Essayist: The Honorable John Boehner, 53rd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives

Tuesday, February 26, 2013 – Essay # 7 – Second Treatise of Government by John Locke – Guest Essayist: Eric Mack Ph.D., University of Rochester, Professor of Philosophy and the author of John Locke (London: Continuum Press, 2009)

Friday, March 1, 2013 – Essay #10 – Marbury vs. Madison by John Marshall – Guest Essayist: Steven H. Aden, Senior Counsel and Vice President of the Center for Life at Alliance Defending Freedom

Wednesday, March 6, 2013 – Essay #13 – A Summary View of the Rights of British America by Thomas Jefferson – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath, Professor of Law at Southwestern Law School

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 – Essay #18 – Virginia Declaration of Rights by George Mason – Guest Essayist: Kevin R. C. Gutzman, J.D., Ph.D. Professor and Director of Graduate Studies Department of History, Western Connecticut State University and Author, James Madison and the Making of America

Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Essay #19 – Fast Day Proclamation of the Continental Congress – Guest Essayist: George Landrith, President, Frontiers of Freedom

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 – Essay #22 – Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom by Thomas Jefferson – Guest Essayist: Gennie Westbrook, Director of Curriculum and Professional Development, The Bill of Rights Institute

Wednesday, March 20, 2013 – Essay #23 – Letter to the Hebrew Congregation by George Washington – Essayist: Robert Lowry Clinton, Professor and Chair Emeritus, Department of Political Science, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Friday, March 22, 2013 – Essay #25 – Letter to the Danbury Baptist Association by Thomas Jefferson – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams, Program Director, Washington-Jefferson-Madison Institute

Monday, March 25, 2013 – Essay #26 – On Property by James Madison – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams, Program Director, Washington-Jefferson-Madison Institute

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 – Essay #28 – The Articles of Confederation – Guest Essayist: Brion McClanahan, Ph.D., Author of: The Founding Fathers Guide to the Constitution

Friday, April 5, 2013 – Essay #35 – Essay I by Brutus – Guest Essayist: Justin Dyer, Ph.D., Author and Professor of Political Science, University of Missouri

Monday, April 8, 2013 – Essay #36 – Letters I and II by Federal Farmer: The Debate about the Size and Scope of the Federal Government is Not New – Guest Essayist: George Landrith, President, Frontiers of Freedom

Thursday, April 11, 2013 – Essay #39 – The Northwest Ordinance – Guest Essayist: Kyle Scott, Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Houston

Friday, April 12, 2013 – Essay #40 – George Washington, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison on Slavery – Guest Essayist: Julie Silverbrook, Executive Director of The Constitutional Sources Project

Friday, April 19, 2013 – Essay #45 – February 6, 1837 Speech on Abolition Petitions by Sen. John C. Calhoun- Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer, President, Institute for Liberty

Tuesday, April 23, 2013 – Essay #47 – Letter to John Holmes by Thomas Jefferson – Guest Essayist: James Legee, Graduate Fellow at the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the study of Free Institutions and the Public Good, Villanova University

Wednesday, April 24, 2013 – Essay #48 – Letter To Edward Everett by James Madison – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Duncan Black Professor Emeritus of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute in Fairfax, Virginia

Thursday, April 25, 2013 – Essay #49 – The Missouri Compromise – Guest Essayist: William C. Duncan, Director of the Marriage Law Foundation

Friday, May 3, 2013 – Essay #55 – Dred Scott v. Sandford by Justice Roger Taney – Guest Essayist: Jeffrey Reed, former Constitutional Law Professor, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 7, 2013 – Essay #57 – “A House Divided” by Abraham Lincoln – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams, Program Director for the Washington-Jefferson-Madison Institute

Thursday, May 9, 2013 – Essay #59 – Seventh Lincoln-Douglas Debate – Guest Essayist: Charles K. Rowley, Duncan Black Professor Emeritus of Economics at George Mason University and General Director of The Locke Institute in Fairfax, Virginia

Friday, May 10, 2013 – Essay #60 – “The Dividing Line between Federal and Local Authority: Popular Sovereignty in the Territories” by Stephen Douglas – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams, Program Director for the Washington-Jefferson-Madison Institute

Tuesday, May 14, 2013 – Essay #62 – Reply in the Senate to William Seward by Jefferson Davis – Guest Essayist: James Legee, Graduate Fellow at the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the study of Free Institutions and the Public Good, Villanova University

Friday, May 24, 2013 – Essay #70 – The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln – Guest Essayist: Professor Will Morrisey, William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the United States Constitution at Hillsdale College

Thursday, May 30, 2013 – Essay #74 – “What is Progress?” by Woodrow Wilson – Guest Essayist: Robert Clinton, Professor and Chair Emeritus, Department of Political Science, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Friday, May 31, 2013 – Essay #75 – Socialism and Democracy by Woodrow Wilson – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams, Program Director of the Washington-Jefferson-Madison Institute in Charlottesville, VA

Tuesday, June 4, 2013 – Essay #77 – The Presidency: Making an Old Party Progressive by Theodore Roosevelt – Guest Essayist: James Legee, Graduate, Master of Arts in Political Science at Villanova University, Graduate Fellow at the Matthew J. Ryan Center for the study of Free Institutions and the Public Good

Is The Pending Deal With Iran Over Its Nuclear Program A Treaty – Or Not? – Guest Essayist: Colin Hanna

This Week, 63 Years Ago-April 8, 1952: Truman Seizes Control of the Steel Industry by Executive Order-What Did the Supreme Court Decide & Why? Part I – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath

Why The U.S. House Is Suing The Obama Administration – Guest Essayist: Hadley Heath Manning

To Rein In Spending, Congress Must Act – Guest Essayist: Scot Faulkner

Federalism On Life Support: The Affordable Care Act And How It Affects You – Guest Essayist: Troy Kickler

The Imperial Obama Presidency and the Demise of Checks and Balances – Guest Essayist: U.S. Senator Ted Cruz

Do You Know How Many Wars Congress Has Formally Declared War In? HINT: It’s Fewer Than You Think – Guest Essayist: Tony Williams

Congress Shall Make No Law – Encroaching On The First Amendment – Guest Essayist: Peter Roff

How Can Words On Parchment Constrain Executive Overreach? Guest Essayist: James D. Best

What James Madison Teaches Us About NSA Surveillance – Guest Essayist: Logan Beirne

What Happens When The Executive Branch Tries To Make Law: The Evolution Of The Contraceptive Mandate And The “Accommodations” That Failed To Respect Protected Conscience Rights – Guest Essayist: Steven H. Aden

The Most Effectual Weapon Against Executive Overreach: The Power Of The Purse – Guest Essayist: Senator Mike Lee

Operation Choke Point: Agencies Getting Around The Constitution’s Protections – Guest Essayist: Andrew Langer

What Government By “The Consent Of The Governed” Looks Like – Guest Essayist: Brion McClanahan

Common Core: Federal Overreach Into A State Issue – Guest Essayist: Hadley Heath Manning

The Constitutional Tools Of Foreign Relations – Guest Essayist: Professor Joerg Knipprath

Undemocratic: How Unelected, Unaccountable Bureaucrats Are Stealing Your Liberty and Freedom (Part 1) – Guest Essayist: Jay Sekulow

Department Of Education Power Grab: The “Opt Out” Debate – Guest Essayist: Elliot Engstrom

An Underhanded Usurpation Of Popular Sovereignty – Guest Essayist: Nancy Salvato

How The Federalists Viewed Human Nature And Its Impact on The Resulting Government System In The United States of America (Part 1) – Guest Essayist: Amy Rofail

Stopping The Usurpation Of Advice And Consent – Guest Essayist: Scot Faulkner

Why Are TPA And TPP Being Referred To As Obamatrade? – Guest Essayist: Nancy Salvato

Common Core: All Too Common Overreach – Guest Essayist: Cynthia Dunbar

Judicial Activism Rescues Obamacare – Guest Essayist: Nancy Salvato

Untried Weapons – Repairing The Tattered Remains Of A Constitution That Has Not Been Tried And Found Wanting, But That Has Been Found Difficult; And Left Untried (Part 4) – Guest Essayist: David Eastman

Untried Weapons — Repairing The Tattered Remains Of A Constitution That Has Not Been Tried And Found Wanting, But That Has Been Found Difficult; And Left Untried (Part 6) – Guest Essayist: David Eastman

Untried Weapons — Repairing The Tattered Remains Of A Constitution That Has Not Been Tried And Found Wanting, But That Has Been Found Difficult; And Left Untried (Part 7) – Guest Essayist: David Eastman

1864, Abraham Lincoln Defeats George McClellan: Constitutional Issues Raised By Lincoln’s Conduct Of The War – Guest Essayist: Daniel A. Cotter

1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Unprecedented Run For A Third Term – Guest Essayist: Andrew Bibby

Constitutional Issues In The 2016 Election – Guest Essayist: Professor William Morrisey